Mets Find Themselves Expecting Something Bad to Happen

July 18, 2009

When the Atlanta Braves’ tenth run crossed home plate in the bottom half of the fifth inning last night, the Mets had zero runs scored to go along with just two hits. Their starting pitcher, Mike Pelfrey, had already been taken out of the game charged with nine of those runs in just four and one-third innings of work. The right-hander also allowed nine hits, two for homeruns. To top it all off, in that dreadful fifth inning, the Mets witnessed another player on their current roster limping off the field. As left fielder Gary Sheffield was attempting to chase down a base hit into the left-centerfield gap, he experienced what Mets trainers described as a cramp.

In Sheffield’s case, it was just a matter of time when the forty-year-old journeyman would breakdown. Reason being, when the Mets acquired him at the start of the season he was considered a right-handed threat coming off the bench not an everyday player. As Sheffield slowly made his way off the field, Mets fans were left shaking their heads. But that wasn’t the end of it. Fans were also disappointed with comments that were made by Sheffield after the game. While downplaying the extent of his injury, he went on to discuss how the body language of some of his teammates would begin to sag when the team fell behind. He continued and said that he noticed the majority of the guys in the dugout were just waiting for something bad to happen. Sheffield did mention that prior to the start of their games the Mets players were confident in their ability to go out there and win everyday.

In defense of Sheffield’s comments, they should be construed as helpful and not necessarily hurtful. His overall concerns towards his teammates to start concentrating on playing more aggressively instead of worrying about what may happen next is probably a by-product of the veteran outfielder having a bad day.

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